12 Isolated Spots to Escape to in BC

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They don’t call it ‘Beautiful British Columbia’ for nothing; with 944,735 square kilometers of stunning backyard to adventure in, we’re more than lucky to call this province home. Among the more popular destinations in BC, there are also quite a few hidden gems that give the perfect mix of breathtaking views and peaceful isolation. If you’re ready to unplug, unwind and recharge your love for this province, then you should check out these 12 isolated spots to visit in British Columbia.

12 Isolated Spots to Escape to in BC

By Roslyn Kent

  • Lake O’Hara

    By Roslyn Kent

    Lake O’Hara is an unrefined gem nestled in Yoho National Park and because of its fragile state it’s not an easy destination to reach. The trailhead is located [12km west of Lake Louise](http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/yoho/visit/cartes-maps.aspx) and once there you’ll find jade-coloured lakes against mountainous backdrops, immense cliffs and numerous trails for exploring the lush forest. [A reservation is required](http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/yoho/visit/faire-do.aspx#ohara), but if you manage to claim a spot on this prestigious list you’ll be pleased you did once you arrive.

  • Flying U Ranch

    By Roslyn Kent

    [Flying U Ranch](http://www.flyingu.com/) is an authentic western ranch situated in Northern BC just 30 miles south of 100 Mile House. With its small, cozy wood cabins and an old-time cowboy saloon, this retreat will make you feel as though you’ve stepped back into a classic Western film. Ride horses by day with friends and family (and without a guide) on over 1,500 acres of land and swim in Green Lake, located just across the road from the ranch, to cool off in the evenings.

  • The Juan de Fuca Trail

    By Roslyn Kent

    The Juan de Fuca Trail has been thought of as a mini West Coast Trail with all of the beauty and half of the hikers. This [49km](http://victoriahiatus.com/victoriahikes/juan-de-fuca-trail.html) wilderness path meanders along the west coast of Vancouver Island between Jordan River and Port Renfrew and passes through a number of stunning beaches such as Mystic Beach and Sombrio Beach. Shoulder a four-day pack along with some sturdy hiking boots and camp out as you hike your way through the island’s majestic forests.

  • Desolation Sound

    By Roslyn Kent

    Located at the confluence of [Malaspina Inlet and Homfray Channel](http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/desolation/), Desolation Sound is any boater’s dream: warm, calm waters and over 60km of shoreline. There are endless islands and coves to explore, which means this is also an ideal spot for kayaking and scuba diving. You’ll need a boat to get there, but the seclusion will surely be worth it once you do. Camp overnight at one of the many campsites and spend a few days in this hidden BC gem.

  • Texada Island

    By Roslyn Kent

    Any adventurous traveler will fall in love with this isolated 50km, 1000-resident island nestled between Vancouver and Vancouver Island. Known as BC’s [largest Gulf Island](http://texada.org/about-texada-island/), Texada offers visitors a wide variety of outdoor activities with numerous hiking and biking trails as well as the opportunity to boat and swim in crystal clear lakes. Although large in size, this island is not as well-known as its other BC neighbours, making it a perfect secluded getaway. Find out how to get there [here](http://texada.org/getting-to-texada/).

  • Cape Scott

    By Roslyn Kent

    This rugged coastal area located in the northwest region of Vancouver Island will fulfill the expectations of any avid hiker. Travel [64km](http://www.hellobc.com/activitylisting/4545245/cape-scott-provincial-park.aspx) west of Port Hardy and you’ll reach this secluded spot where you can venture on many hikes, visit white sand beaches and trek through temperate rainforests. If you’re up for it, hike the Cape Scott Trail (18km) or the North Coast Trail (58km) and camp overnight on the beach. Find directions [here](http://www.capescottpark.com/plan-prepare.html).

  • Telegraph Cove

    By Roslyn Kent

    Telegraph Cove was once a popular fishing village and now serves as a hub for various types of [eco-tourism](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove.aspx) in BC. [Whale watching](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/parks-wildlife/whale-watching.aspx), bear watching, [hiking](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/outdoor-activities/hiking.aspx), [diving](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/water-activities/diving.aspx), [fishing](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/water-activities/fishing.aspx), [kayaking](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/water-activities/kayaking-canoeing.aspx), [caving](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/outdoor-activities/climbing-caving.aspx) and authentic [aboriginal experiences](http://www.hellobc.com/telegraph-cove/things-to-do/arts-culture-history/aboriginal-experiences.aspx) all operate out of this quaint cove on Northern Vancouver Island. With only 20 residents and a truly rustic and simplistic feel, Telegraph Cove is one of BC’s more isolated destinations.

  • Muncho Lake

    By Roslyn Kent

    Just off the Alaska Highway, you’ll find this tranquil, tucked-away park with [“some of the most outstanding views of natural beauty”](http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/muncho_lk/) in all of BC. Diverse wildlife, towering mountains, complex geological features and vibrant wildflowers are just a few of the natural wonders that can be found in this Provincial Park. Muncho Lake itself is 12km of luminous turquoise water and you have the choice of camping at two different campsites to extend your time at this serene spot.

  • Gwaii Haanas

    By Roslyn Kent

    As a World Heritage Site, a top kayaking destination in [North America](http://www.lonelyplanet.com/canada/british-columbia/queen-charlotte-islands-haida-gwaii/sights/parks-gardens/gwaii-haanas-national-park-reserve-national-marine-conservation-area-reserve-haida-heritage-site#ixzz3iExTcYZM) and an abundant archeological location for abandoned Haida villages, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve is well worth the lengthy journey required to get to Haida Gwaii. The park can be accessed by boat or plane only and a reservation is required to visit the park from May to September (without booking a tour).

  • Bugaboo Provincial Park

    By Roslyn Kent

    Isolated is the Purcell Mountain range’s middle name. Only accessible by helicopter, dirt road or an expert level [rock climb](http://www.summitpost.org/bugaboo-spire/153346), those who have had the privilege of visiting this astonishing natural beauty are among BC’s lucky few. The Bugaboo Provincial Park is also an incredible [heli-skiing](http://www.canadianmountainholidays.com/en/lodging/bugaboos.aspx) and [heli-hiking](http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/canada/heli-hiking-in-the-canadian-rockies-british-columbia/) destination in the [Purcell Mountains](http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/bugaboo/) of Southeast British Columbia.

  • Savary Island

    By Roslyn Kent

    A white sandy beach paradise with a rugged forest landscape that offers local charm and a laid back hippy vibe, Savary isn’t necessarily easy to get to. You’ll need to take [two ferries](http://wikitravel.org/en/Savary_Island) and a water taxi from Vancouver, but you will definitely be able to relax once you arrive. The island has [no electricity](http://www.waywest.ca/location/savary-island), so power down your cellphone and explore the island’s warm waters, diverse sea life and endless sandy shores.

  • Seven Summits Alpine Ridge Trail

    By Roslyn Kent

    Looking for an alpine mountain biking challenge with stunning views for the entire duration? The Seven Summits Trail is a [30.4km](http://www.trailpeak.com/index.jsp?con=trail&val=1825) mountain ridge ride that passes over seven peaks in the Rossland region. This back country trail is a part of the Monashee Mountains and traverses above the Red Resort Ski Hill along the way.

Feature image: Jeff Wallace

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