Travel advisory: Canadians warned to avoid ‘non-essential travel’ to parts of Mexico

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The Government of Canada is warning travellers that they should avoid all ‘non-essential travel’ to parts of Mexico in a recent travel advisory.

The advisory warns that people ought to exercise a high degree of caution in Mexico as a result of high levels of criminal activity. In addition, it warns that the advisory is in place due to demonstrations, protests and occasional illegal roadblocks throughout the country.

A ‘high degree of caution’ is issued when there, “are identifiable safety and security concerns or the safety and security situation could change with little notice.” As such, tourists must exercise a high degree of caution at all times, as well as monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

The advisory states that residents should avoid ‘non-essential travel’ to a number of northern states due to high levels of violence, which is linked mainly to organized crime.

‘Non essential travel’ means that there, “are specific safety and security concerns that could put you at risk.” As a result, tourists should reconsider whether the degree of risk is necessary.

These northern states include:

  • Chihuahua
  • Coahuila (except the city of Saltillo)
  • Durango
  • Nuevo León (except the city of Monterrey)
  • Sinaloa (except the city of Mazatlán)
  • Sonora (except the cities of Hermosillo and Guaymas/San Carlos)
  • Tamaulipas.

In addition, the government advises that tourists avoid all ‘non-essential travel to the western states of Guerrero (including Acapulco but excluding the cities of Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Taxco), Michoacán (excluding the city of Morelia) and Colima (excluding the city of Manzanillo) due to the high levels of violence and organized crime.

Right now, Canadians will be safer sticking to resorts and areas that do not pose a significant threat. While a number of states have advisories, popular city destinations, such as Mazatlan, do not have them.