The best places to see bald eagles in the Lower Mainland

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Three eagles / Shutterstock

Selected as an emblem of strength and independence, bald eagles are one of the animal kingdom’s most majestic creatures.

And while you might not be able to see them on your daily commute, there are many places in the Lower Mainland to spot them. In fact, there are some places that attract hundreds, if not thousands, of the soaring raptors.

Have a look at some of the best places below.

Squamish Estuary

Eagle viewing is at its peak from mid-December to mid-January, and an eagle count is done at the Brackendale location each January. What’s more, Squamish had the world record count of 3,769 eagles in its 1994 bird count.

Harrison Mills

British Columbia is home to the largest bald eagle gathering on the globe. The convocation takes places in November, when thousands of eagles make their way to the place where the Fraser River and Harrison River meet. The majestic raptors migrate great distances to feast on the five species of salmon that are spawning during the fall.

Vancouver Landfill

On the day this video was recorded, a whopping 1,500 regal raptors were counted at the landfill. However, eagle biologist David Hancock reports that up to 3,000 may be viewed in this location. The Vancouver Landfill is located at 5400 72 Street in Delta.

“They come out of nowhere – and suddenly you have hundreds in a few minutes because they just watch everything. Their eyes are much, much sharper, than human eyes. They have a better perception of what’s going on and they see small details we can’t see,” he said.

  • A note regarding access to the Vancouver Landfill property itself: Given the nature of the site, it is private, and members of the public have to be accompanied by a staff member and complete a safety orientation session if they are granted permission to the site. Please do not trespass on the property without securing proper permission.

Boundary Bay

Boundary Bay Regional Park attracts thousands of bald eagles annually. What’s more, the park is home to a vast array of migratory birds, so it is the perfect place to go birdwatching. As part of the Pacific Flyway Migration Route, the area is part of an important bird migration through Alaska to Central and South America.

With files from the Vancouver Courier.