Family and friends to honour B.C. man who died climbing Stawamus Chief

The Squamish Chief

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On Sept. 21, friends and family will gather at Pavilion Park in Squamish to honour Ken Anderson.

At 33 years old, Anderson died on Aug. 4 after falling while climbing the Stawamus Chief.

He lived and climbed in Squamish for nearly a decade.

At 33 years old, Anderson died on Aug. 4 after falling while climbing the Stawamus Chief. Photo: Thomas Burden

“Our intention is to host a gathering to share all the joy that Ken brought to our lives. We want to celebrate his love of rock climbing, his love of the outdoors, and the positive influence he had on the people with which he connected. We want to create space to share and make memories that help keep his energy present,” Kaylyn McCaw, one of the organizers, said in an email to The Chief.

A few speeches will pay tribute to Anderson, and a slideshow will feature photos and videos of his adventures. There will also be food, drinks, music and dancing until 10 p.m., as well as a silent auction that will help support Anderson’s partner.

“We encourage his wide circle of family, friends, and community connections to attend,” McCaw said. “Grief has a ripple effect and we also want anyone who has been supporting someone through his loss to feel welcome. It is important to connect with each other and to strengthen our support networks in a time like this. We want to honour Ken by capturing the breadth of connections he made and the deep impact he had on our lives.”

The celebration of life will take place from 3:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 21 at Pavilion Park.

Friends are also raising funds on GoFundMe to cover the costs of the boat Anderson lived on. A small portion of the funds will also cover event costs.

“Ken inspired others to pursue their passions. He was an encouraging and humble person to be around. He would enthusiastically listen to anyone talk about their pursuits or dreams and help stoke their fire regardless of whether their interests aligned with his,” Kyla Burrill, another organizer, said in an email. “He loved life, dreamed big and lived simply.”