Skip to content
Join our Newsletter
VIA store 300x100
Join our Newsletter

Food recall: Frozen mango tainted with Hepatitis A may have been sold in B.C.

Some Canadians have gotten sick from the contaminated product
frozen-mango-recall-brands
Certain brands of frozen mango chunks are being recalled in Canada. The product may be tainted with Hepatitis A and some Canadians have reported becoming sick from consuming the product.

A recall has been issued for several brands of frozen mango chunks due to concerns the lots may be contaminated with Hepatitis A.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency issued the Class 1 recall July 30, indicating multiple products originating from distributor Nature's Touch Frozen Food Inc should not be consumed.

The CFIA pinpoints distribution of the product in Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, however, the agency also notes some of the affected product was possibly distributed on a national level, meaning some of the contaminated product might be in British Columbia. 

Store brands Compliments, sold at Sobeys Inc. stores like FreshCo, Thrifty Foods, and Safeway, and President's Choice, sold at Loblaw stores like City Market and Real Canadian Superstore, are included in the recall.

There have been reported illnesses linked to the products in the recall, notes the CFIA.

The CFIA and Nature's Touch indicate the following specific bags of frozen mangoes should be discarded:

frozen-mango-recall-CFIAScreenshot / Health Canada

Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased, instructs the CFIA. 

Food contaminated with Hepatitis A virus may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this virus may cause hepatitis and produce a self-limited disease that does not result in chronic infection or chronic liver disease. The illness is usually mild and starts about 15 to 50 days after the contaminated food is eaten. It generally goes away by itself in a week or two, although it can last up to 6 months in some people. It can cause inflammation of the liver, and symptoms may include fever, low appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches, and yellowing in the whites of the eyes and the skin (jaundice).