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Here is how fast COVID-19 can spread after a road trip in B.C. (INFOGRAPHICS)

How do you follow something you can't see?
roadtrip-covid-19-cases
Fraser Health has issued some infographics using real data that demonstrate how seemingly harmless road trips and gatherings can have catastrophic consequences. 

How do you follow something you can't see?

Back in the fall, B.C. health officials issued a number of infographics that show how quickly the coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads. Since then, they have released a few more, which illustrate other ways the virus can quickly spread. 

Fraser Health has issued some infographics using real data that demonstrate how seemingly harmless road trips and gatherings can have catastrophic consequences. 

From one road trip

In the first example, Fraser Health depicts a group of friends who embark on a summer road trip across B.C. On days two and four, the travellers meet up with people at their destination.

While in destination, the group visits a number of places, including an ice cream shop, a brewery, a store, a friend's BBQ, a winery, a restaurant and a coffee shop. 

On days five through 18, the group returns to familiar routines back at home and the virus spreads even further. 

In total, 18 people test positive for COVID-19 after the road trip or coming into contact with someone who travelled on it. Additionally, 64 people need to self-isolate as a result of the trip and are unable to go to work or school. 

 

One social gathering 

Before the winter holidays, Fraser Health issued an infographic that showed how far the virus could travel after one social gathering. On the first day, a small group or family gathers to socialize.

From day two to 10, the entire group tests positive for COVID-19. On days 11 and 12, many of the group's contacts also test positive for COVID-19.

 

Data shows thousands of travellers flew from Canada to Hawaii over the past 2 months

Several Canadian politicians have come under fire for vacationing south of the border, and travel data from the State of Hawaii shows that thousands of flights departed from Canada to the tropical state over the past couple of months.

The State of Hawaii's Safe Travels Digital Platform portal shows data on all of the flights that came into the country during the pandemic, including the airport of departure, what the reason for the visit was, the exemption to be able to visit Hawaii, accommodation upon arrival, and the airline.

Since Nov. 1, 2020, a staggering 4,415 people have flown from Canada to Hawaii. 

Avoid non-essential travel 

While there currently isn't a law against travel outside of Canada during the pandemic, the federal government says you should avoid non-essential travel outside Canada until further notice. 

Further, provincial governments across the country have enacted their own travel advisories. Health officials, including Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix in B.C., continue to encourage locals to stay in their communities and stress that doing so will help to slow the spread of COVID-19.