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Stanley Park’s nine o'clock gun to sound at 7 p.m. in support of health care workers

Vancouver residents have been making noise every night during COVID-19 outbreak
Stanley Park’s nine o’clock gun will become a seven o’clock gun as of Monday night. Photo Wikicommo
Stanley Park’s nine o’clock gun will become a seven o’clock gun as of Monday night. Photo courtesy of Vancouver Parks Board

The Vancouver Park Board issued a press release about its decision to move the firing of the cannon at Brockton Point in Stanley park from 9 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Effective March 30 until the end of April, the 7 p.m. firing is in solidarity with a growing portion of Vancouverites who signal their thanks to health care workers at the same time every day.

“I’ve been contacted by several members of the community over the past few days who are asking what more we can do to demonstrate our appreciation and gratitude for health care workers in our city,” said Camil Dumont, Vancouver Park Board chair. “We thought it was a great idea but had to do some work behind the scenes to ensure it was something we could see through. I’m pleased that our operations team has found a way to shift the cannon’s firing schedule to 7 p.m. beginning Monday.”

The iconic British cannon was gifted to Canada in 1856. It was brought to Stanley Park in 1894 by th
The iconic British cannon was gifted to Canada in 1856. It was brought to Stanley Park in 1894 by the Department of Marine and Fisheries. Photo Wikicommons

According to the press release, "The iconic British cannon was gifted to Canada in 1856. It was brought to Stanley Park in 1894 by the Department of Marine and Fisheries and was originally used to warn fishermen of the 6 p.m. Sunday close of fishing. Years later, the cannon began firing at 9 p.m. to allow chronometers of ships in port to be accurately set to the current time."

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