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These home movies offer insight into Japanese Canadian history

The museum has digitized more than 40 historical home movies from its collection.
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nikkei-mubi
Ichiro Shiino taking a photograph on Vancouver Island, a 1941 photo that’s part of the Japanese Canadian National Museum collection. The Nikkei National Museum is hosting a film screening featuring digitized versions of some of its family home movie holdings. Photo: JAPANESE CANADIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 2010.18.33

The Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre is offering a unique look into the lives of Japanese Canadian families.

The museum is hosting a film screening of Nikkei Mubi: Japanese Canadian Home Movies from the 1930s to ’70s. It’s on Saturday, Feb. 8 from 2 to 3:30 p.m.

The museum has digitized more than 40 historical home movies from its collection. The fragile 16-mm, 8-mm and Super 8 films will now be safely placed in long-term storage, and the digitized versions will soon be available online.

At the screening, audiences can get a glimpse into the personal and public lives of Japanese Canadians from the 1930s to the 1970s on the West Coast, across Canada and abroad.

“Nikkei Mubi presents a unique perspective on Canadian history, highlighting generations of the Japanese Canadian community and their resilience in a time of discrimination,” said a press release about the screening.

The Nikkei National Museum is at 6688 Southoaks Cres. (near the corner of Kingsway and Sperling Avenue).

Tickets for the screening are $5, including museum admission, or $4 for seniors. It’s free for Nikkei Centre members and students.

For details, see centre.nikkeiplace.org/events/nikkei-mubi/ or call 604-777-7000.

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