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Time Traveller: Burrard Dry Dock was the first Canadian shipyard to hire women

On International Women’s Day, we honour their contributions during the war effort
Time Traveller (for March 10 edition)WEB
This 1942 photo shows the first women to be employed at Burrard Dry Dock.

This photo from 1942 shows the first women to be employed at Burrard Dry Dock (sheet metal shop) during the Second World War.

Burrard Dry Dock was the first Canadian shipyard to hire women and their work was essential for the war effort. The first women came into the Shipyards in September of 1942.

During this time, women experienced workforce equality for the first time. At Burrard Dry Dock, women were paid the same wages as men and earned the same medical and housing benefits. But this employment equity was fleeting. At the end of the war, the women were forced to give up their shipyard jobs to men returning from the war.

For International Women’s Day (March 8), it is important not only to remember the important contribution women made towards the war effort, but to also acknowledge the contribution these pioneering women made breaking ground towards women’s equality in the workplace.

Visit the MONOVA website for more information about the history of the North Shore and to learn about MONOVA: Museum of North Vancouver opening in 2021.

Currently, the Archives of North Vancouver at 3203 Institute Rd. in Lynn Valley is open by appointment only. Contact: archives@monova.ca