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Another coyote attack in Stanley Park: jogger bit from behind

Anyone in the park should use abundant caution, as there is a high risk of encountering an aggressive coyote.
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The B.C. Conservation Officer Service (BCCOS) is investigating a coyote attack on a woman who was jogging in Stanley Park on August 11, 2021.

The B.C. Conservation Officer Service (BCCOS) is investigating a coyote attack on a woman who was jogging in Stanley Park. 

On Aug. 11 around 5:12 p.m., a woman was jogging along Bridal Path near Prospect Point when a coyote approached her from behind and bit her leg, explains a release. She suffered minor injuries. 

The incident follows an attack on a five-year-old boy the previous day; the boy was taken to hospital but has been released. 

Conservation officers continue to patrol Stanley Park to ensure safety but people are encouraged to stay out of it.

Anyone in the park should use abundant caution, as there is a high risk of encountering an aggressive coyote.

The COS says it "will be focusing on trapping efforts on specific areas to minimize the chances of catching a non-target coyote" and that "any coyotes captured that do not match the profile of the offending animal will be released."

The COS adds that it will continue to work with "wildlife biologists, park rangers, area organizations and the municipality" to find solutions to conflicts with the resident coyotes. 

Conservation officers put 'soft foot-hold traps' in Stanley Park to catch coyotes

In July, conservation officers used "soft foot-hold traps" to catch coyotes. Four coyotes were captured and killed but the BCCOS did not comment on whether the canines were the targets. 

In a Tweet, the BCCOS said one of the "coyotes was captured in very close proximity to the site of the recent attack." 

Animal rights groups noted that these traps are "completely indiscriminate" and other animals, pets, and people could get caught in them. 

The Stanley Park Ecological Society website tells park visitors never to feed coyotes and to shout, wave their arms or throw rocks or dirt near the animals if they appear curious or begin to approach.

Please report any aggressive coyote encounters to the RAPP line at 1-877-952-7277.