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ICBC gas rebate cheques not popular (but we'll take that money anyway): poll

Less than a quarter of survey respondents think gas rebates are a good idea
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For Canadians, gasoline proved to be the biggest factor driving price increases last month, jumping 32.3 per cent.

Drivers in B.C. in will be getting a $110 kickback from the Insurance Corp. of British Columbia  in the coming weeks, whether they need it or not.

Premier John Horgan announced last month that, because the public insurer was flush with cash since the introduction of no-fault insurance, everyone with a registered vehicle would be getting a cheque or direct deposit to offset rising gas prices. As of April 8, regular gas was going for about $1.91/litre in the Lower Mainland, thanks in part to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

But how do North Shore residents feel about the sudden subsidy? North Shore News polled 1,267 readers and asked the question: What do you think of the province's $110 gas rebate cheques for drivers?

The poll ran from March 29, to April 8. Of the 1,267 votes, we can determine that 537 are from within the community. The full results are as follows:

They're good. The price of gas is really hurting affordability right now. 23.46% local, 24.63% total    
They're bad. The province is using ICBC's money to bribe us to keep using fossil fuels. 23.46% local, 23.99% total    
I don't think they're a great idea, but I will still be cashing mine. 53.07% local, 51.38% total    
  Local   Total

As the Steve Miller Band famously advised: take the money and run. Or in this case, take the money and drive.

Direct deposits will be made for those with ICBC accounts in May. Those not set up for direct deposits will receive their cheques in June.

Results are based on an online study of adult North Shore News readers who are located in North Vancouver and West Vancouver. The margin of error – which measures sample variability – is +/- 2.74%, 19 times out of 20.

North Shore News uses a variety of techniques to capture data, detect and prevent fraudulent votes, detect and prevent robots, and filter out non-local and duplicate votes.