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This all-inclusive assistive technology program is helping B.C. workers overcome barriers in the workplace

The WorkBC Assistive Technology Services program, operated by Neil Squire, helps people who face obstacles in their employment-related activities by providing access to supportive tech.
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Person using assistive technology. Photo: Neil Squire

Today, the way we work is in a constant state of flux. As employees try to keep up with the changes and overcome obstacles, there are services available to assist these workers.

“Assistive technology is our superpower at Neil Squire,” says Nate Toevs, Marketing Manager for the WorkBC Assistive Technology Services program, which is operated by Neil Squire, a non-profit organization based in Burnaby. “We’ve learned that we can help people get close to one hundred percent of their physical capability through the use of assistive technology, whether it’s high tech, low tech, software, hardware, or ergonomics.” 

The program, which was launched in the spring of 2019, taps into Neil Squire’s 35 years of expertise in the area of assistive technology. 

WorkBC Assistive Technology Services provides funding for supports such as assistive devices, equipment and technology, ergonomic and restorative supports, communication and hearing devices related to work, workplace access and modification, and vehicle modifications. 

“There’s a million different ways that we can help somebody increase their capability using tools at work,” says Toevs. 

Offered across BC, the program “is to help people who have a barrier to their employment related activities,” explains Toevs. “So certainly the focus is on people with disabilities, but it has a broader reach than that because it’s also people who have an old injury or chronic pain, anything that prevents them from essentially giving one hundred percent of themselves in the workplace.” 

The program is not only for those who are working; it’s also available to those who are job searching through WorkBC Employment Services.


Person with a physical disability working. Photo: Neil Squire 

A BENEFIT TO BUSINESS

Businesses across B.C. will benefit from the support system that WorkBC Assistive Technology Services provides to B.C. workers of all backgrounds and circumstances.

“We’re dealing with an aging workforce that will have more people with chronic pain issues, more people losing their vision, and more people losing their hearing,” says Toevs, “and there are different supports out there depending on the degree of challenges those individuals are dealing with. We know that we can bring a lot to the table that can really make a huge impact for that individual which obviously will impact the company that they work for.” 

DURING COVID-19

Neil Squire has a long history of providing services remotely to clients. According to Toevs, a steady flow of applications for the program have come through in the past few months. 

“We have seen a dramatic increase in work from home activities and it is safe to say many people do not have an ideal ergonomic situation,” says Nate. “We have had many questions surrounding supports for people struggling with adapting to their new at home work reality.” 


Nate Toevs, Marketing Manager at WorkBC Assistive Technology Services. Photo: Neil Squire

JOIN A WEBINAR TO LEARN MORE

To learn more about the program, join Nate Toevs at one of his weekly webinars, held each Wednesday from 12:30pm to 1:00pm. 

To join a webinar, register online or contact Toevs via phone at 604-473-9363 ext. 122 or by emailing him at natet@neilsquire.ca.

For more information on WorkBC Assistive Technology Services, check out their website at workbc-ats.ca or contact their team at 1-844-453-5506 or info- ats@workbc.ca.

 

This Content is made possible by our Sponsor; it is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of the editorial staff.