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Everything’s coming up roses, including the essential goods moving through the Port of Vancouver this year

The Port of Vancouver helps Vancouverites get the gifts and cards they want to send to their Valentines year after year.
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Roses.

Our Valentine’s Day celebrations will be different this year, but the time-honoured tradition of sending tokens of affection to the ones we love won’t change. 

And it's the Port of Vancouver that helps Vancouverites get the gifts and cards they want to send to their Valentines year after year. 

The Port of Vancouver is Canada’s largest port and, according to the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority—the federal agency responsible for the stewardship of the port—the volume of goods arriving through the port in containers is significant. 
 
In fact, more than 25 million metric tonnes of imported and exported goods are moved through the port in containers each year. 
 
These containers carry necessities that we rely on every single day—and include all the stuff that we look forward to giving and receiving during holidays and special occasions.  
 
In 2019, more than 208 million bouquets of flowers (including fresh and artificial), such as roses and tulips, were imported and exported through the port. 
 
Additionally that year, more than 41 million one-pound boxes of chocolates, candy, and other sweet confectioneries and more than 76 million greeting cards passed through the Port of Vancouver. 
 


Centerm Container Terminal in Vancouver. Photo: John Sinal.

When a container ship full of imported goods arrives at a terminal, a team of workers work around the clock to ensure the containers are safely removed from the ship, and put on a truck, train, or barge to be sent to local destinations, and out across Canada.  
 
In order to keep the movement of goods flowing, the Port of Vancouver relies on the support of many key players who work together to keep the supply chain running.  
 
It’s a job that requires teamwork from all those involved in the shipping container business, including cargo and ship owners, marine pilots and tugboat operators, terminal and rail line operators, longshore workers, freight forwarders, truckers, and so many others.  
 
And although we may celebrate differently this year, what will remain the same is that the Port of Vancouver will continue to support local jobs and businesses across the country and connect people through the gifts they love giving to the people they love most.  

For more info, visit portvancouver.com.