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Emergency rescue efforts for endangered killer whale hit snag in Canada

American and Canadian scientists are considering a Hail Mary effort to save an endangered four-year-old killer whale, known as J50, which appears emaciated, lethargic and has lost about 20 per cent of its body weight. J50, left, is seen in U.S.
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 American and Canadian scientists are considering a Hail Mary effort to save an endangered four-year-old killer whale, known as J50, which appears emaciated, lethargic and has lost about 20 per cent of its body weight. J50, left, is seen in U.S. waters off Washington state in a July 21, 2018, handout photo. An endangered killer whale that has prompted an international rescue effort won't receive antibiotics by dart or by fish if it's found in Canadian water today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-NOAA, NOMADS-EXPEDITIONS.COM, Katy Laveck FosterAmerican and Canadian scientists are considering a Hail Mary effort to save an endangered four-year-old killer whale, known as J50, which appears emaciated, lethargic and has lost about 20 per cent of its body weight. J50, left, is seen in U.S. waters off Washington state in a July 21, 2018, handout photo. An endangered killer whale that has prompted an international rescue effort won’t receive antibiotics by dart or by fish if it’s found in Canadian water today. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-NOAA, NOMADS-EXPEDITIONS.COM, Katy Laveck Foster

An endangered killer whale that has prompted an international rescue effort won't receive antibiotics by dart or by fish if it's found in Canadian water.

While veterinarians are prepared to try delivering the experimental life-saving treatments in American waters, Paul Cottrell of Fisheries and Oceans Canada says officials are still wading through the paper work in Canada to make sure any efforts to treat the animal don't affect other members of her pod.

The orca known as J50 appears emaciated and scientists have said she may have only days to live.

She is one of only 75 remaining southern resident killer whales that are found in coastal waters from British Columbia to California.

J50 was last seen Friday in Canadian waters, but researchers haven't spotted her pod since then.

Teri Rowles of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says that if they find J50 before she dies they'll assess her health and determine if they will administer antibiotics by pole or by dart, and she may receive further treatment of salmon laced with medication.