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Vancouver weather forecast calling for 14 straight days of sunshine

It doesn't look like we'll see that many April showers.
sunshine-weather-forecast-vancouver-april
The Vancouver weather forecast calls for two weeks of spectacularly sunny, pleasant weather, albeit the nights will still feel cool. 

Keep your sunglasses handy. 

The Vancouver weather forecast calls for two weeks of spectacularly sunny, pleasant weather, albeit the nights will still feel cool. 

While Friday, April 9 was dismal in the city, The Weather Network calls for a dry two weeks to come, with daily highs reaching up to18°C. 

While Saturday and Sunday will see daily highs just below the double digits, temperatures are expected to climb starting Monday. Daily highs are expected to range between 14°C and 17°C through until next Friday. 

On Saturday, April 17, the forecast calls for a daily high of 18°C and bright sunshine. And while daily highs aren't expected to soar that high again that week, overnight lows aren't expected to dip below 7°C. 

Metro Vancouver Weather Forecast 

vancouver-weather-sunny-week-1.jpgPhoto via The Weather Network

 

vancouver-weather-sunny-week-2.jpgPhoto via The Weather Network

While summer might start off with a bang in Metro Vancouver, April's forecast isn't looking particularly warm for the Lower Mainland.

Environment Canada Meteorologist Armel Castellan tells Vancouver Is Awesome that April's forecast looks cooler than average this year. What's more, he says it looks like the month will see temperatures up to 2°C below seasonal averages. 

"I think we're going to see a higher probability of seeing that continued northwesterly flow giving lower normals," he explains. 

"We don't see anomalous warmth. That's kind of why the April forecast seems pretty consistent."

Following April, however, Castellan says the south of B.C. is expected to see above-average temperatures for May and June. That said, he notes that the forecast is still showing the weaker "end of the probabilities," such as 40 to 50 per cent.